Italy’s One-Legged Cyclist Turned World War I Hero

Enrico Toti, Italian WWI Hero

Enrico Toti may have the most fascinating World War I story I’ve ever read:

Enrico lost his left leg while working for Italian railways, at the age of 24. After his injury he became a cyclist. In 1911, riding on a bicycle with one leg, he cycled to Paris, and then through Belgium, the Netherlands and Denmark, up to Finland and Lapland. From there, via Russia and Poland, he returned to Italy in June 1912. In January 1913 Toti started cycling again, this time in Egypt; from Alexandria, he reached the border with Sudan where the English authorities, considering the trail too dangerous, ordered him to end the journey, and sent him to Cairo where he came back to Italy. When war broke out between Italy and the Austrian Empire, Toti tried to volunteer for the Italian army but was not accepted due to his injury. Undaunted, he reached the frontline with his bicycle and managed to serve as an unpaid, unregistered, fully non-regulation “civilian volunteer” attached to several units.

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Rooted in Italy: The World’s First Botanical Gardens

It has been said (too many times) that all roads lead to Rome. But did you know that you could trace botanical medicine and even the environmental movement to 16th century Italy? It was here in the city of Pisa (1544) then Padua (1545) that the world’s first botanical gardens were set up.

This month’s Italy Blogging Roundtable topic is “roots” – a nod to spring. And what better nod to spring than to go straight to the garden? I’ve covered gardens in this blog before, from a mention of the reissue of Edith Wharton’s book Italian Villas and Their Gardens to Cortili Aperti, the “open courtyards” initiative that each year gives visitors a chance to check out gardens and courtyards at private estates. But I’ve yet to touch on Italy’s many botanical gardens, which are almost always historically linked with their cities’ universities.

The Orto Botanico di Padova is the world’s oldest academic garden still in its original location and it has been a model for all subsequent botanical gardens around the world. From the beginning, the mission of the Orto Botanico di Padova has been to collect local and unique plant life, maintain an herbarium for the study of plants for use in medicine, and educate the public on botany, horticulture, and the need for plant conservation. The Orto Botanico di Padova is one of Italy’s UNESCO World Heritage Sites, having been inscribed in 1997. The most famous plant specimen at the Padua Botanic Gardens is a Mediterranean Palm, the “Goethe Palm,” which dates from 1585 and was written about by Goethe. Additionally, the gardens have a library and a museum. The Orto Botanico di Padova is open daily from April to October; from October to April, it is open mornings Monday through Saturday. The current admission price is €4, subject to change.

An Italian visitor to the Orto Botanico di Padova took a comprehensive tour of the gardens and created this video:

While Padova can claim to have the world’s oldest botanical gardens still in their original location, the city of Pisa was were the first academic gardens were founded. The botanist Luca Ghini, at the behest of Cosimo de’ Medici, set up the University of Pisa’s botanical gardens in 1544. However, the garden moved twice, in 1563 and 1591, before settling at its current location. My Italy Blogging Roundtable colleague Gloria has a beautiful post about the Orto Botanico di Pisa, complete with photos.

Italy’s botanical gardens don’t often make it on the tourist itinerary. But they are actually quite ideal, as most are located near the city center and often a quiet respite from sightseeing. Other Italian cities with well-positioned botanical gardens include Rome (near Trastevere), Bologna, Milan (it has three), and Palermo, to name just a few.


Read the posts, leave comments, share them with your friends – and tune in next month for another Italy Blogging Roundtable topic.

Photo Flickr/Ned Raggett

Falling For Italy: Three Fun Activities to Put on Your Radar

 

Cascatemarmore

This month for the Italy Blogging Roundtable, my colleagues and I decided we would write about “fall.” Not autumn, but fall. So that left me a little bit of room for interpretation. Without doubt, Italy is a wondrous place to be in the fall: leaves are changing, fall fashion is beckoning from store windows and on the perfectly trim bodies of Italian males and females, and truffles are appearing on menus throughout the country. But I decided to write about “fall” in a different way by highlighting a few interesting activities that take you away from the art and the shopping and the endless indulging of food and wine – all fabulous things but not the end-all-and-be-all of what Italy has to offer for active travelers. The following three activities are focused on “fall” but are not strictly reserved for autumn.

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Exploring Italy’s Parks

parcoautunnoFall is a great time to explore Italy’s national and regional parks, what with the beautiful foliage changing colors and the majority of tourists – both Italian and international – having packed up their bags and headed home. Italy currently has 22 national parks – with two more in the process of being established – and dozens upon dozens of regional parks and protected areas.

The best place to find information about Italy’s parks is at the parks portal at www.parks.it. Here you will find information about each of the parks, staying or dining near the parks, and upcoming events, among many other details. Some autumn events that caught my eye are the Night Tour in the Parco in Ussita in Le Marche, Wolf Weekend in Aquila (Abruzzo), and Trekking with Donkeys Between Fairy Tales and Chestnut Woodlands near Rome. And, for you gadget heads, Italy’s park service is experimenting with GPS-guided walks.

One of the best tools for researching and deciding on a park to visit is the parks.it map tool. Here, you can zero-in on parks within regions or provinces. For example, I chose to search parks in the region of Lazio and the province of Rome. The result was 31 protected areas, including one protected wetland. Though you can’t click through on every park to find out more info about it, you can learn which ones are nearby. So, if the din of Rome is getting to you, you’ll see that green space is not very far away!

Have you had an unforgettable visit to one of Italy’s parks? Tell the Italofile Community about it.

Photo by troise

The Real Pinocchio

Pinocchio Marionettes in Collodi, Tuscany
Pinocchio Marionettes in Collodi, Tuscany

Last November, the New York Review of Books released Carlo Collodi’s The Adventures of Pinocchio under its NYRB Classics imprint. The tale, as reviewed by Tim Parks in the latest issue, is much darker than the Disneyfied version. After the jump is Parks’ full review. As always, I urge you to subscribe to NYRB; they often review books on Italy and even have an Italian version, La Rivista dei Libri.

By the way, if you’re visiting Tuscany with kids, you may be interested in venturing to the Parco di Pinocchio in the author’s hometown of Collodi (Carlo Lorenzini adopted the town’s name for his nom de plume).

Knock on Wood
By Tim Parks
The Adventures of Pinocchio
by Carlo Collodi, translated from the Italian by Geoffrey Brock, with an introduction by Umberto Eco and an afterword by Rebecca West

New York Review Books, 189 pp., $14.00 (paper)

A voice yells from within a pine log, “Don’t hit me too hard!” The carpenter is astonished, his axe stayed. When they come unexpected, life and language are unsettling.

Brought into being by blows, the talking log proceeds to start a fight: the carpenter’s friend Geppetto has arrived to ask for a piece of wood and the voice mocks his yellow wig; Geppetto imagines he is being insulted by his friend and in a moment the two are on the floor, scratching, biting, and thumping. Consigned to Geppetto, the lively log contrives to bang his shins and provoke a second misunderstanding and a second fight before it is taken away.

Old Geppetto is something of an artist. His house is bare, but he has painted bright flames in the fireplace and a merrily boiling pot above them; when reality is hard, illusion may offer consolation. Now Geppetto is about to embark on a much greater act of creation: he will fashion a traveling companion who can “dance and fence, and do flips,” so that together the two can earn a “crust of bread” and a “cup of wine.” He’s thinking of company and economic advantage. But no sooner has Pinocchio been carved from his living log than he is snatching off Geppetto’s wig, revealing the reality of his maker’s baldness. Taught to walk, he runs off. When Geppetto catches up and starts to give the puppet a fierce shaking, he is arrested for assault and jailed. The artist has lost control of his creation. Raw vitality with no inhibitions, Pinocchio is freed into a world of hot tempers, vanity, ignorance, and appetite; a violent tussle is never far off.

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Ramble On: Tuscany Walking Festival

Walking Festival in TuscanyTuscany, with its beautiful vistas and thousands of hectares of nature preserves and woodlands, offers numerous opportunities for serious hikers and casual trekkers alike. This is the also the thought of the organizers of the Tuscany Walking Festival, a yearly event that happens goes on roughly between the first days of spring until the end of fall.

The festival highlights six of the great hiking areas in Tuscany, including the Maremma, the Monti Livornesi and the Tuscan Archipelago. In addition to the great walks are other events and promotions, such as photography exhibits, birdwatching courses, and restaurant discounts near the walking regions. What a great way to learn about Tuscany’s natural treasures and take a break from art overload!

Photo from Tuscany Walking Festival

A Peaceful Oasis in Rome


After reading a post about Free Things to Do in Rome from fellow blogger Jessica at Italylogue.com, I couldn’t resist commenting on one of my favorite places – free or not – in all of the Eternal City: the Protestant Cemetery. Then I thought I should also share this tip with Italofile readers, too.

The Protestant Cemetery, also known as the Non-Catholic Cemetery, is located behind the grand Pyramid or, in Italian, Piramide, itself a burial site for Roman magistrate Gaius Cestius who died around 12BC. Surrounded by tall trees, which miraculously drown out the din of Roman traffic just beyond the Pyramid, the well-kept cemetery is the final resting place of a few names from literature, notably John Keats (whose unmarked epitaph famously reads “Here lies one whose name was writ in water”) and Percy Bysshe Shelley, who died in a boating accident off the coast of Tuscany, but who wrote parts of Prometheus Unbound while living in Rome. Many expats and non-Catholic Italians have been laid to rest at the Protestant Cemetery and you can find lists of others buried there (ordered by name, nationality, etc.) by checking out these databases.

Indeed, it may seem a little morbid to spend time at a cemetery while in Rome. At the very least, it may seem odd to go out of one’s way to visit one of Rome’s least-visited (and certainly little known) sites. But, the Protestant Cemetery is just one of the many free things you can do in the Eternal City and is a great place to recharge your batteries after hours of dodging traffic and long lines.

Photo from the Protestant Cemetery website

The Ultimate Italian Driving Adventure

If you’re the type of traveler who likes to go it alone and doesn’t mind injecting a little technological know-how into your trip, then a GPS-driven self-guided tour may be the ticket.

Information about Zephyr Self-Guided Adventures through Italy just crossed our desks over the weekend. The company offers walks, biking, and driving tours through Tuscany, Umbria, and parts of Lazio, all of which are powered by GPS navigation. According to a press release:

The GPS Navigation systems have pre-loaded waypoints along the driving routes and are designed to accompany written turn-by-turn directions. With simple touch commands travelers can easily get from one destination to another. These portable systems not only allow for a comfortable traveling pace, but are also a cheaper alternative to the typical guided vacation.

In addition to the GPS Navigation systems, these driving tours come with a “virtual tour guide” in the form of a Portable Media Player loaded with short videos. In these videos, Zephyr Adventures President Allan Wright gives a daily route talk summarizing what to expect for each day while certified Italian guide (and Zephyr in-country support representative) Giovanni Ramaccioni gives entertaining cultural and historical presentations about sights on the route. The cultural videos were filmed at the exact spots the travelers pass through.

The combination of these two technologies allows for the ultimate driving adventure.

While Zephyr may have touched on a rather novel concept, we also like the fact that they have worked in the price of hotels and rental cars, so you don’t have to do any extra legwork (unless, of course, you choose to walk or bike your way through central Italy). Rates start at $1,250 per person, not including airfare.

A Snowy Staycation in Rome

You must be thinking: there are two things wrong with this post. First, it’s too early to be talking about snow. And, second, how can you have a “staycation” in Rome if you don’t even live there?

I defer to a recent press release from onthesnow.com. In “The No. 1 Snow Sports Web Site Picks Top 10 Ski Staycations,” onthesnow says:

The newest buzzword in the travel vocabulary is “staycation.” It means staying home and still doing the things one loves to do. That’s difficult for skiers and riders who don’t live in tiny mountain towns and villages.

OnTheSnow.com’s 17 regional editors, based in alpine regions around the world, have selected 10 excellent ski and snowboard options, all within a tank of gas, from a metropolitan area. That’s staying, at least, close to home and still indulging in a favorite sport.

Coming in at number 4 on the list is Rome. The Gran Sasso subregion (listed as the San Grasso region in the release, unfortunately), with its Campo Felice ski area, is within about a tank of gas of the Eternal City and offers, according to onthesnow’s editors, “varied skiing and snowboarding experiences, and there are a surprising number of challenging pistes. The weekends get crowded, but there are 16 lifts. There’s not much nightlife at Campo but, after all, home is Rome.”

And to address the part about it being too early to talk about snow? Well, snow in August is not unheard of in Rome. In fact, legend has it that the papal basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore was built on a hill where a miraculous snow fell on August 5.

On a personal note, this talk about “staycations” gives me the opportunity to plug a colleagues newest book. Backyard Adventures may not be about travel in Italy. But, it just may give you some good ideas for activities to do while you’re planning next year’s trip to Italy.

The Pontines, Perhaps

Unlike Greece, Italy isn’t a land of islands. Sure, there’s Sicily, Capri, and the Tuscan Archipelago, which includes Elba. But there is also a small set of islands in the Tyrrhenian Sea between Rome and Naples that, according to Guy Dinmore of The Financial Times, “offer a safer and saner way to travel” for those who want a “sedate alternative to dashing around packed piazzas.”

In “Escape to ‘Alcatraz’,” Dinmore explores the Pontine Islands, which were once used as prison islands by the likes of Emperor Augustus and Mussolini. You can still take a tour of Santa Stefano, the main prison island, which is today uninhabited, or stay on Ventotene to visit its subterranean dwellings and Roman cisterns or go snorkeling. Dinmore also touches on Ponza, the most popular of the Pontines, and Ischia, which is not exactly a Pontine island but typically grouped with Capri and Procida.

Ponza, apparently, is having its day in the sun lately, as German In Style magazine included it among its round-up of party islands. In Style suggests the following Ponza haunts:

Need more convincing? Check out these spectacular photos from the Pontine Islands on Flickr.

Photo by RonnyBas

Swimming in Sardinia

An article today in the New York Times on Swimming Vacations inspired us to see if there were any swim adventure tours in Italy. In fact, one of the companies profiled – Swimtrek (located in London) – offers a one week swim trip around Sardinia’s Maddalena Archipelago. The tour features:

    Swimming from Maddalena to Spargi.
    The crossings between the three northern islandsof Budelli, Santa Maria, and Razzoli are inspiring.
    The swim down Caprera’s eastern shoreline is a great delight, ending at the beautiful beach of Tahiti (named after the South Pacific island!)
    Enjoying the abundant flora and fauna as we make tracks across the archipelago.
    Savouring the delights of the main town of La Maddalena.

For this season, there are still two dates available – June 14-20 and September 27-October 3. If you’re a swimming enthusiast, this is a wholly unique way to see Italy. As an added bonus, each day you’ll have a chance to work off all that pasta you ate the night before!

Even More Italian Beaches Get the Blue Flag

There are now 104 beaches in Italy that have been awarded the “blue flag” for clean water and sand. According to Italy Magazine, the Foundation of Environmental Education (FEE) found that the top beaches in Italy were in Tuscany and the Marches, each of which have 15 blue flag beaches. Liguria and Abruzzo came in second and third, with 14 and 13 blue flags, respectively.

For more information about FEE and to get a full list of blue flag beaches, check out fee-international.org and blueflag.org.

Beaches of Lazio

Continuing our series on Italy’s beaches, today we’re highlighting the beaches of Lazio. Most visitors to Lazio, Rome’s region, forget that the Tyrrhenian is as close as half an hour away. In fact, many Roman nightclubs relocate to beaches like Fregene. And, there are also some lovely strands south of Rome in Terracina and Sperlonga.

Province of Viterbo
The area known as the Maremma extends into the northern part of Lazio in the province of Viterbo. The sub-region is called the Maremma Laziale, and it has a couple of beaches worth checking out. The Marina di Montalto near the medieval town of Montalto di Castro is a modern tourist resort with hotels, campgrounds, and plenty of beach chairs to rent for the day. Further south, Tarquinia, which is known for its Archeological Museum of local Etruscan finds, also has a seaside area with similar facilities to Marina di Montalto.

Beaches of Rome
Did you known you can access Rome’s nearest beach by train? It takes about half an hour to ride the train from Piramide (Metro Line B), past Ostia Antica, to the Ostia Lido stop where you want to go. Rome’s local beach, which is also convenient to Fiumicino Airport in case you’ve got a long layover, has several large hotels and, in summer, a vibrant nightlife scene. Another summer favorite for Romans is Fregene, which can also be accessed by public transport (Metro Line A to Lepanto, then blue COTRAL bus to Fregene; travel time: 1 hour). While Fregene is known as the summer address of many big Roman clubs, such as Goa or Gilda, its also a great place to ride a bike and eat tasty seafood, as explained by this New York Times’ article on Fregene.

Elsewhere in the province of Rome are lesser-frequented beaches and extremely busy ports. If you’re taking a cruise that bypasses Rome, then you’ll be disembarking at Civitavecchia. This huge port is not necessarily where you want to plop down a beach towel, but it is here where you can rent a boat or catch a ferry to Sardinia. However, within the Civitavecchia municipality, there are a few stretches of sandy beach. Down the Via Aurelia from Civitavecchia is the seaside resort of Santa Marinella, which is geared more towards families than club-goers. Many other towns and beaches dot the coast of the Province of Rome all the way down to Anzio, a European Blue Flag (i.e., exemplary) beach with ferry connections to the Pontine Islands, and Nettuno, where you can not only catch some rays, but in summer also a little baseball. Of course, Anzio and Nettuno are well-known for being sites of major American offensives during World War II – and, consequently, of American Memorial cemeteries.

Riviera d’Ulisse
The coastline along the Province of Latina is better known as the Riviera d’Ulisse or the Riviera of Ulysses. Ulysses is the Latin for Odysseus, who is said to have landed here during his famous Odyssey. These are the beaches worth going out of the way for if you are staying in Lazio for a while. White sand, dramatic cliffs, and romantic grottoes make up the geography here, from San Felice Circeo to Terracina to Sperlonga. The area of San Felice Circeo is a hub for windsurfing and kayaking and the Parco Nazionale del Circeo is a favorite haunt for birdwatchers.

The Pontine Islands
Finally, the small cluster of islands off the coast of Lazio are known collectively as the Isole Pontine. Part of the Province of Latina, most of the Pontine Islands are uninhabited, save for Ponza and Ventotene. Like the nearby Circeo Park, Ponza and Ventotene are known for their wildlife and nature preserves, which make them a real getaway from the hustle and bustle of Rome (or crowded beaches). To read more about Ponza, check out The Independent’s article Ponza: Italy’s Secret.

Photo by Mortimer

Beaches of Tuscany

With summer on the horizon, we’ve got sun and surf on the brain. So, in the coming weeks and months, we plan to highlight the beaches of Italy.

First up is Tuscany, which has some of the most pleasant beaches you’ll find anywhere. While Tuscany’s beaches are hardly a secret – for example, Viareggio and Forte dei Marmi can be PACKED in July – they are typically less congested than Florence, Siena, and the tourist routes. We can’t profile every single beach for you, but here is a run-down that we have compiled from our research for the Unofficial Guide to Central Italy.

The Riviera Versilia
Tuscany’s most famous stretch of strand, framed by the marble-topped Apuan Alps, is called the Riviera Versilia, and it features the chic resort of Forte dei Marmi (considered the “Hamptons” of Tuscany), the “Carnevale” town of Viareggio, and smaller seaside areas like Lido di Camaiore and Marina di Pietrasanta. Versilia is popular in the region because, unlike many coastal areas south, it has a sandy shore. Yet, despite its popularity, Versilia has a ton of blue flag beaches, too. For more information, check out the Versilia Tourism website.

The Tuscan Archipelago
Many travelers forget that Tuscany has its own little set of islands to explore. The Tuscan Archipelago includes Isola del Giglio, a moutainous island that has facilities for windsurfing and scuba and Isola di Giannutri, also rocky but suitable for snorkeling and nature treks. Another of the seven islands of the Archipelago is Montecristo, the setting for Dumas’ classic The Count of Montecristo; Montecristo is open to tourists only with permission from the Italian Government. Of course, the mother of all islands of the Archipelago is Elba, itself famous for being where Napoleon was once exiled. Among the other isles, Elba has the most hospitable beaches, plenty of restaurants and nightlife, and numerous connections to the mainland via ferry. More information about Elba and its sisters is available from the Arcipelago Toscano website. You may also be interested in these articles: Seeking Exile in Elba (The Washington Post) and Italy’s Undiscovered Islands (Travel and Leisure).

The Etruscan Riviera
Inland from the Archipelago, the Riviera Etrusca is the place to go in Tuscany if you’re looking for a more natural beach getaway. Stretching from Livorno to Piombino, this strand is mostly rocky, but has some sandy shores around Marina di Cecina and Castiglioncello. As the name implies, you can also spend time investigating Etruscan ruins along the coast and inland among the pine groves. For more info on the Etruscan Riviera, check out the Costa degli Etruschi website.

Coastal Maremma
While traditionally the Maremma is considered to consist of mostly farmland, it does have a number of seaside towns, most of which are frequented by beachhouse owners from Tuscany and Lazio. But, coastal Maremma does have a little something for everyone: families will like Follonica and Marina di Grosseto; chic resort-goers can choose from Porto Santo Stefano or Porto Ercole (both on the Promontorio dell’Argentario) or Punta Ala. Meanwhile, the interior pastureland and the Parco dell’Uccellina, which contains some untamed sandy beaches with craggy cliffs, are great for nature lovers. For more information on the beaches of the Maremma Coast, see the Official Website of the Maremma and the website for the Comune di Monte Argentario.

Photo by Roby Ferrari

Italian Villas and Their Gardens

Just in time for late spring and summer romps around Italy comes the reissue of Edith Wharton’s 1904 landscaping classic Italian Villas and Their Gardens.

According to curators with the New York Society Library’s Green Art collection, “Wharton visited some fifty villas around Rome, Florence, Siena, Genoa, in Lombardy, and the Veneto. Many were closed to the public.” We do know, however, that several estates that she visited are open to the public, including the Boboli Gardens in Florence (part of the Medici’s Pitti Palace estate) and the Este family villas at Tivoli (near Rome) and Lake Como (in Lombardy, click on “Hotel” then “History&Garden” for more info).

Wharton’s book, with illustrations by Maxfield Parrish, provides a unique look into Italy’s famous gardens from over a century ago. Tourists and garden enthusiasts may want to pick up a copy of this book before embarking on an Italian villa tour. Another great source of Italian villa and garden information is available on the Grandi Giardini Italiani website.

Photo from Grandi Giardini Italiani

What’s Old Is New Again: Rome’s Via Appia Antica

The Via Appia Antica in RomeNow that we’ve entered the Holy Season, tourism to Rome is going to start heating up again quite quickly. Of course, you can follow the pilgrimage throngs around the Lenten Station circuit. Or, you can travel outside the city walls to check out the Via Appia Antica.

David Farley’s one-day itinerary along the ancient road recently published in the NY Times is a great break from the crowds of the Trevi Fountain, the Colosseum, and the Vatican Museums. Known in English as the Appian Way, Via Appia Antica is unfortunately left off of many tourists’ agendas. Blame Rome for having too darn much to do and see.

One hassle-free way to “do” the Appian Way is by taking the Archeobus, a tour bus service run by Rome’s municipal transportation company. You can hop on the Archeobus at several stops within town, including the Termini Train Station, the Circus Maximus, or the Baths of Caracalla, and travel to the attractions of the Appian Way, including the Catacombs. Once you get to the Appia Antica park, you can even rent a bike for a couple of euros.

The price for the Archeobus starts at €13. You’re lucky to even get a gelato at that price these days!

Photo from Parco Appia Antica website

Walk for a Cause in Italy

As I was preparing to post information about the Italy Breast Cancer Walk 2008, which will take place in September, I learned that registration for the event had closed. At any rate, what a wonderful way to see Italy and raise money for a worthy cause.

This year’s walk will be through the region of Le Marche (the Marches), starting in San Severino and finishing up in Tolentino. During the week-long trek, participants will “walk more than 60 miles, with the longest day being 18 miles and reaching an elevation of 3,000 feet. Walkers will stay in small family-run inns and eat home-cooked meals and fresh pastas.”

Although registration to this year’s Italy walk is closed, Ride for a Cause, the nonprofit that organizes the tour, has other walk/ride events in Ireland and Spain this year. This is the third year that RFAC and their partner, Girosole Walking Tours, have planned a Breast Cancer/AIDS walk in Italy, so you may want to get in touch with either group to see what’s in store for 2009.

Coloring the Skies

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This weekend, the incredibly picturesque town of Castiglione del Lago, located on the banks of Lake Trasimeno in Umbria, will become even more beautiful. The event is called Coloriamo i Cieli, and it features some of the world’s most interesting kites as well as its most adept kite fliers.

Since its inception, in 1982, the festival has spawned dozens of smaller programs, such as hot air balloon rides, nature walks in Parco del Lago Trasimeno, art exhibits, such as a collection of Chinese kites, and food fairs in Castiglione’s main piazza. Indeed, in Umbria, Coloriamo i Cieli means that spring has sprung!
Photo: Let’s colour the sky 27042007-001, originally uploaded by Giuseppe Toscano.